Well, not all of it, but Microsoft has made it possible to enter the .NET Framework code when debugging. Although configuring Visual Studio to do this is a little more work than what you need to do with, say, Java and Eclipse (which is: none), I believe it is still quite a useful feature. It allows developers to go into the code of the .NET Framework and see what’s happening with the objects that are passed on.I have yet to

Following my previous post on UML, I’d like to point out a tool I like very much. It’s only for sequence diagrams but I find it does the job very good, and real quick too. Also, it’s far less of a pain than Microsoft Visio when changes have to be made. The name is Tracemodeler and can be found on tracemodeler.com. The advantages are plenty. For the record, I did not code this tool, so I’m not trying to sell

Okay, here goes my first real post. Every developer must have at least a basic understanding of UML. In my opinion, it can be a very powerful tool for explaining the architecture of applications (even to yourself after not having worked in the code for a while). It’s much more easy to follow a neat diagram, than to have to dig through the code and go from method to method, switching between classes and trying to remember where in the